Vape Shop in Edisto, SC | #1 Smoke/Vape Store | Smape Shop

10150 Dorchester Rd Suite 214 Summerville, SC 29485

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Vape Shop in Edisto, SC

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Your Go-To Vape Shop in Edisto, SC

Welcome to The Smape Shop, where the worlds of smoking and vaping come together to give you the best buzz in the Lowcountry! As a locally owned smoke shop in Edisto, we have built our reputation on sourcing the finest smoking accessories and vaping products in the industry. As experts in our trade, our goal is to give you the very best vape and smoke shop experience in South Carolina. That way, you leave feeling happy, informed, and excited about your new purchase. It doesn’t matter if you’re in town for the weekend or we see you regularly. Our customers receive the same personalized, boutique service every time they walk through the front door.

Our loyal customers keep coming back to the Smape Shop because we offer the following services:

  • Free Shipping – Yes, you read that right. Buy a product from the Smape Shop, and shipping is on us!
  • Low Prices – We will beat the price on any listed competitive product in South Carolina.
  • Warranties – All manufacturer warranties are guaranteed when you purchase a product from the Smape Shop.
  • Easy Returns – All Smape Shop products are guaranteed returnable within 30 days of your purchase if you experience a manufacturer defect.
  • Easy Shopping – Our team of friendly, knowledgeable vape and smoke experts makes your life easy and irie. Have a question? We’ve got an answer for you.
  • User Services – We make it a priority to educate all of our customers on how to use our products.

At the end of the day, we know that life is hard. We’re here to make it more bearable, one puff at a time.

What is Vaping?

Thirty years ago, the idea of an electronic cigarette seemed like something out of a sci-fi movie. Enjoy nicotine without having to burn tobacco? That’s nonsense!

Today, vaping is one of the most popular ways to “smoke,” with Euromonitor estimating that 55 million people worldwide enjoy tobacco-free devices. If you’re reading this page, chances are you’re well-versed in the world of vaping. But for those who aren’t, let’s get you caught up.

Typically, adults vape by using battery-operated devices called “vapes” or “e-cigarettes,” which are used to inhale a vapor. This vapor usually contains nicotine and other flavorings. Puffing on the vape engages the battery-powered heating device, which turns the liquid into an aerosol or vapor, which users enjoy in a variety of potencies. Adults vape for many different reasons, most commonly for the wide selection of flavors, their ability to be used inside, and their use in cigarette smoking cessation.

There are a few main components in almost every vaping device. Check out the breakdown below or ask your

What is Vaping?
Battery

Battery

The vape’s battery is its primary energy source and is used to power the atomizer. The battery is the most essential part of any vaporizer product because it provides the power needed to heat the coil. The vape battery generates power, the coil heats liquid, wax, or herb, and vapor is formed. Without the battery, your vaping device won’t work. Not all vaping batteries are the same, so be sure to select one with enough power for your needs. More on that later.

Atomizer

Atomizer

The atomizer’s job is to heat e-liquid, which turns the liquid into vapor.

E-Liquid

E-Liquid

Also known as e-juice, this substance is inserted into a vape and gives the vapor its flavor and nicotine. Today, there several varieties of e-juices to choose from, which give vapers the chance to experiment with various flavors.

Cartridge

Cartridge

The cartridge is a small container that holds vape juice or e-liquids. This container is sealed from the heating coils of your vape and only touches the wick. When you visit the Smape Shop, ask your vape expert about our disposable and reusable vape cartridges!

Wick

Wick

Typically made of cotton fibers, the wick gets saturated with e-juice from the container. The oil moves along the fibers of the cotton until it comes into touches the e-coils. Vapor is produced and inhaled when the heated e-coils and the wick touch.

Geek Vape Aegis X

SUB OHM TANK AND MOD

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mAh¬ and Your Vape Battery

Many e-devices within our vape shop in Edisto, SC come with a built-in battery. However, these batteries vary in power. You can find out how powerful the battery is by looking at its mAh, or Milliamp Hour. In the world of vaping, mAh refers to how much energy the vaporizer’s battery can store on a single, complete charge. The higher the mAh, the more energy can be stored in the battery. With a higher mAh, you will be able to use your vape or e-cigarette longer without charging. The mAh number is important to look at, especially if you’ll be traveling and won’t have access to a power outlet or charging station. If you’re always out and about, pick a vape with a higher mAh. If you’re only using your e-device at home, you may not need to have a high mAh.

What are the Different Types of Vaping Devices?

Vapes come in a wide range of models and forms. Some vapes need to be filled with e-liquid, while others require cartridges. There are also more advanced vapes on the market, sometimes referred to as Box Mods or just Mods. These devices often include modifications to battery power or cartridge size. Vape devices are generally categorized into one of three generations. However, some vapers are now adding a fourth generation to account for advances in vaping technology.

Cig-a-Likes (First Generation)

Made to mimic the size and look of traditional cigarettes, this first-gen vape is heavier than a regular cigarette. It will often have an LED light on the end, which illuminates when the user inhales. If you are new to vaping or e-cigarettes, cig-a-likes may be the first thing that comes to mind. These vaping devices are usually inexpensive and easy to use. Some cig-a-likes are considered disposable, meaning you throw them away after the battery dies. Others are rechargeable and have replaceable cartridges.

Mid-Size E-Cigarettes (Second Generation)

Larger than cig-a-likes, mid-size vapes have been said to resemble laser pointers. These devices usually have a button, which users press while inhaling. Mid-size vaporizers often have larger battery capacities and last longer than cig-a-likes. It’s common for the battery of a second-generation e-cigarette to feature a threaded connection which is compatible with several atomizers. For added customization, some mid-size e-cigs allow the user to adjust the voltage for more power.

Advanced Personal Vapes (Third Generation)

These advanced vaporizers are larger and bulkier than second-generation vapes. They are also more complicated from a technical standpoint and can come with modifications. Some mods include longer lasting batteries and have a higher refill capacity. These advancements aren't available on first and second-generation vaporizers. If you’re new to vaping, ask one of our experienced Smape Shop employees for more info on the AVPs we have in stock.

Innovative Regulated Mods (Fourth Generation)

Historically, vaporizers have been classified into three generations. However, new technology has led to the creation of a fourth generation by some vape users. This generation features more powerful and highly advanced mods. Some features include temperature controls, rebuildable tanks, adjustable airflow slots, and dual airflow slots, to name a few.

Vape mods typically come in two forms:

  • Mechanical Vape Mods:

    Regulated mods are complex modifications that involve modifying the vaporizer's voltage or wattage output. They often have features like resistance meters and safety additions like reverse battery polarity protection. These mods are most often used by experienced vapers.

  • Regulated Vape Mods:

    Regulated mods are complex modifications that involve modifying the vaporizer's voltage or wattage output. They often have features like resistance meters and safety additions like reverse battery polarity protection. These mods are most often used by experienced vapers.

Which Vape is Right for Me?

If you’re new to vaping, it can be hard to pick a device. With hundreds of choices available, you may not know where to start. Don’t stress, though: we’ve got a breakdown to help you out.

Cig-a-Likes

  • Who Should Buy Cig-a-Likes:

    These first-gen vapes are great for folks who might be trying to kick traditional cigarettes. They are small, portable, and often are designed to look like tobacco cigarettes. They have a mouth-to-lung inhalation process, allowing the user to puff on the vape like a traditional cigarette without the smell. They are also free of the harsh toxins and chemicals often found in cigarettes, making them a great choice if you’re trying to quit conventional smoking.

  • Who Shouldn’t Buy Cig-a-Likes:

    These first-gen vapes are great for folks who might be trying to kick traditional cigarettes. They are small, portable, and often are designed to look like tobacco cigarettes. They have a mouth-to-lung inhalation process, allowing the user to puff on the vape like a traditional cigarette without the smell. They are also free of the harsh toxins and chemicals often found in cigarettes, making them a great choice if you’re trying to quit conventional smoking.

Advanced Personal Vapes

  • Who Should Buy AVPs:

    AVPs (or box mods) are highly customizable, so if you like to have more control over your vaping experience, an AVP could be the way to go. These devices are great for all vaping styles and often come equipped with a longer battery life with both mouth-to-lung and direct-to-lung variants.

  • Who Shouldn’t Buy AVPs:

    If you prefer an all-in-one package with little-to-no assembly, an APV isn’t for you. If you’re a newer vaper, understand that AVPs have a higher learning curve. So, if you just want something easy to vape, a box mod might not be the best fit for your needs.

Mid-Size Vapes and Vape Pens

  • Who Should Buy Vape Pens:

    Pens usually come with a battery, tank, and safety features that shut off the vape after a few seconds. These rechargeable devices offer both mouth-to-lung and direct-to-lung options. If you like ease of convenience and portability, a vape pen might be your best bet.

  • Who Shouldn’t Use Vape Pens:

    These vapes have a shorter battery life than AVPs. Many require the user to clean the e-juice tank. If you don’t want to take the time to clean your device, this style of vape isn’t right for you.

Smape Shop Pro Tip

If you’re anything like us, you may prefer to speak with a real-life person about your vaping options. We recommend that all new vape users swing by our vape shop in Edisto, SC. When you swing by and say hi, you will have the opportunity to see our vapes up close, hold them, and get more information from our team of vaping experts.

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One-Stop Smoke Shop in Edisto, SC

If “vape life” just isn’t for you, don’t worry – we’ve got a HUGE selection of smoking accessories for you to choose from when you visit the Smape Shop. Whether you’re looking for a brand-new waterpipe to ring in the weekend or need tobacco to roll your own cigarettes, we’ve got you covered.

Some of our most popular smoke shop products include:

Dab Rigs
Dab Straws
Hookas
Classic Tobacco Pipes
Cigarillos
Blunt Wraps
Cones
Cigars
Kratom
CBD

We only carry the best name brands for you to choose from, like White Owl, Dutch Master, Backwoods, Al Capone, and many more. Have questions about a product? Curious where a particular waterpipe was created? Our knowledgeable staff is ready to answer all of your questions. Our goal is to make your time with us easy, so you can focus on having a good time without feeling pressured to purchase until you’re ready. So, go ahead and “roll up” to our store – you’ll be happy you did!

Thank you for your support! Ask about our loyalty program to save $10 on a $20 purchase upon loyalty card completion.
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Latest News in Edisto

Edisto man says THC helped him recover from brain injury, FDA warns of dangers

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – A legal drug, closely related to marijuana is gaining popularity in the Lowcountry.Doctors say there is some danger with the product Delta-8 THC especially around children, but one man says the product changed his life.February 20, 2013, is a day that Joshua Hayes says he will never forget. “I got in a car accident, I was driving down the road,” says Joshua Hayes, a Delta-8 consumer.Hayes ran his car into a tree on River Road on Johns Island, leaving him with a traumatic brain ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – A legal drug, closely related to marijuana is gaining popularity in the Lowcountry.

Doctors say there is some danger with the product Delta-8 THC especially around children, but one man says the product changed his life.

February 20, 2013, is a day that Joshua Hayes says he will never forget. “I got in a car accident, I was driving down the road,” says Joshua Hayes, a Delta-8 consumer.

Hayes ran his car into a tree on River Road on Johns Island, leaving him with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and in a coma in the hospital for two months.

“My whole life has been nothing but pain. I have been in the hospital every day and I’ve broken both my knees, wrists, face and nose like 15 million times,” said Hayes.

Doctors told Hayes he would never be able to walk, talk or communicate with his family again. He struggled with painkillers for months, and then he says he tried a new product for the first time.

“It’s kind of a way to make you smarter, make your brain work better, and take the edge off,” says Hayes.

It’s called Delta-8 which is considered a cousin to marijuana, but it’s legal to sell on store shelves across the state. The product often comes in the form of candy which doctors say helps with marketing.

“The idea of this product in the form of a gummy makes young people who are interested in substance may be interested to seek this out,” says Dr. Kevin Gary, a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at MUSC.

Dr. Gray says the product can also be dangerous.

“Young children may also just mistake this for candy,” Dr. Gray says.

While consumers like Hayes benefits from the product, the Food and Drug Administration has cited serious health risks for the product. They have reported 39% of children under 18 years old, hospitalized with poison exposure.

“You really don’t know how much Delta-8 THC or even cannabinoids are in this,” says Dr. Gray.

Stores like I Heart CBD in Mount Pleasant say Delta-8 is one of their best-selling products, sourcing their hemp from company-owned farms to know exactly where the product is coming from.

“There is products out there that can say 1000 mg on the bottle and you find out those lab reports, and it says 500 mg or less. Half of the concentration is not in a lot of these products,” says Justin Walczuk, Owner of I Heart CBD in Mount Pleasant.

For consumers like Hayes, he says he is taking things one step at a time. Hayes says Delta-8 has changed his life and helped him, as he’s struggled with addiction and numbed his pain forever.

“My personality is, show me that I can’t and I will show you that I can. This Delta-8 product is not only the best thing I have found, but it’s the best way I know that you can heal yourself,” Hayes says.

Padgett Powell conveys ‘whimsical profundity’ in essay collection, ‘Indigo’

Florida native Padgett Powell made his literary debut in 1984 with “Edisto,” a justly celebrated coming-of-age tale set in South Carolina’s then coastal wilderness, for which the author has a deep affinity.With its sly social commentary on the encroachment of Sunbelt capital, “Edisto” thrived on muted hilarity and Lowcountry swing, and it was a finalist for a National Book Award.Powell has since published five additional novels and three short-story collections. He’s received many awards, suc...

Florida native Padgett Powell made his literary debut in 1984 with “Edisto,” a justly celebrated coming-of-age tale set in South Carolina’s then coastal wilderness, for which the author has a deep affinity.

With its sly social commentary on the encroachment of Sunbelt capital, “Edisto” thrived on muted hilarity and Lowcountry swing, and it was a finalist for a National Book Award.

Powell has since published five additional novels and three short-story collections. He’s received many awards, such as the Prix de Rome Fellowship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He served 35 years in the University of Florida’s MFA creative writing program, “teaching what cannot be taught,” a saw which Padgett Powell, a card, only half-believes.

Always a wild jack personality, he was a daredevil writer even as a Florence, South Carolina, high school student in 1970, when he was arrested for publishing an underground newspaper called Tough (expletive).

Later, in the University of Houston’s creative writing program, he improved himself under the tutelage of the late Donald Barthelme, the innovative short-story master who Powell reveres throughout “Indigo: Arm Wrestling, Snake Saving, and Some Things in Between,” his new collection of essays on family and food, places and painters, authors and other animals, too.

At first look, Powell would seem to have been a renegade from the South’s dilapidated gentry — indeed, he describes himself in boyhood as “a bourgeois snot.” In “Indigo’s” wonderful autobiographical piece, “Hitting Back,” with its accompanying picture album, his family appears to have been a mostly hard-drinking tribe, bookish and eccentric.

“[There] is photographic evidence of enough nut blood and thespian gameness in my clan,” he writes, “to get any but the truly uninterested off to a well-grounded start in the art of assembling strange truths in less strange lies…”

Like the filmmaker Werner Herzog, Powell wants to know how things work, and this intellectual curiosity distinguishes “Indigo.” The straightforward travel piece, “Bermuda,” for instance, elaborates on the proper construction of Bermuda shorts. In his article about C. Ford Riley, the Florida “habitat artist,” he interrogates Riley about his technique and method. (He “works through a mirror” situated about eight feet from his paintings of turkeys, creek bottoms and longleaf pine.)

Norman Mailer was Powell’s first major influence, until a professor gave him William Faulkner’s “Absalom, Absalom!,” which, he says, was, and is, “as close to a religious experience as I am likely to suffer on Earth.”

In “Indigo’s” more cosmic moments, Powell teases a running theme he calls the “God v. Darwin v. neither debate,” citing, for example, redfish and speckled trout, “two fish (that) constitute as strong an argument as there is for the brilliance of Darwin or God.”

He balances these cerebral interests with an attraction to the bushy world, where wood is good and true. It’s a clever double-game game, and, over the course of this book’s 18 pieces, mainly published during the 21st century, he plays it well, revealing a complex persona of whimsical profundity, and, equally, its reverse: “I have been lying, and the exhaustion of lying now suggests I relax and just say a few things and admit that the things I have already presented are bogus here and there.”

As usual, this is only half-right, because Powell is a formidable journalist with an obsession for detail. In “Cleve Dean,” a riotous profile of the world champion arm wrestler from Pavo, Powell outlines the intricacies, strategies and secrecies of this surprisingly dangerous sport, which Dean “revolutionized” with his “top roll.” The man was huge: “The thumbhole in Cleve Dean’s custom-made bowling ball will accommodate a banana.”

The centerpiece of “Indigo” is “Flannery O’Conner,” a chaotic disquisition, originally delivered at Columbia University, that’s crammed with splendid outbursts, manifesto-like blasts and non sequiturs: “Jesus I now know, though Flannery would cane me for this, is the invisible friend that we tell children after age 5 they may not have … My Jesus wears a Pink Panther suit dirty at the knees.”

Powell is a rough-and-ready outdoorsman, or nearly so: “I am an amateur ignorant of every plant and bird in the woods, stumbling on the rocks, after the snake.” His emotionally charged conclusion, “Saving the Indigo,” documents his lifelong quest to find the endangered indigo snake in the wild. And, with the help of the noble Orianne Society, he does so, locating one in “The palmetto rhizomes (that) emerge from and turn back into the bank like giant snakes themselves, a metropolis of thick rhizomes like elephant trunks in mud.”

Powell wonders, Can the indigo be saved? “Or is it the case that an effort to save a snake would be the very most hopeless effort in the entire lost world, the lostest of lost causes that has left us our mostly ruined planet?”

Enriching “Indigo,” melancholies rise through hidden shale. Throughout these seemingly randomly chosen essays, with their comic veneer and powerful acerbic energy, the author steers himself and the reader into a deeper blue, and it becomes clear that this is the story of Padgett Powell’s life, or, short of an actual memoir, it may be held in regard as such.

In his 1996 sequel, “Edisto Revisited,” he wrote, “The road out of Edisto is the best one I know to drive with nothing, or a lot, on your mind … the road out of Edisto is enough.” It’s a road that he continues to pilot in his serpentine way.

NONFICTION

“Indigo: Arm Wrestling, Snake Saving, and Some Things in Between”

by Padgett Powell

Catapult

272 pages, $16.95

Coastal Storm to Deliver Significant Coastal Flooding in Florida, Georgia, Carolinas

High pressure is building into the Northeast. Low pressure is now organizing and will soon track from the Gulf of Mexico to off the Southeast coast by Saturday. This difference in pressure will drive northeast winds along the Southeast coast.Tides will be higher than normal at the same time onshore winds are blowing due to the alignment of the new moon with the moon's closest approach to Earth. These tides are known as the perigean spring tides.Fortunately, this coastal flooding will be minor in the mid-Atlantic from New Jersey...

High pressure is building into the Northeast. Low pressure is now organizing and will soon track from the Gulf of Mexico to off the Southeast coast by Saturday. This difference in pressure will drive northeast winds along the Southeast coast.

Tides will be higher than normal at the same time onshore winds are blowing due to the alignment of the new moon with the moon's closest approach to Earth. These tides are known as the perigean spring tides.

Fortunately, this coastal flooding will be minor in the mid-Atlantic from New Jersey to Delaware. In these areas, it will be nothing close to the magnitude of last week's coastal flood event.

However, major coastal flooding at high tide is forecast at times into the weekend from parts of the North Carolina coast to Georgia. Significant coastal flooding is also forecast to occur as far south as northeast Florida, including the Jacksonville area. The southern end of the St. Johns River will also see some flooding.

Coastal flood alerts (warnings, watches and advisories) have been issued by the National Weather Service (NWS) for all of these locations.

Beach erosion, high surf and dangerous rip currents will also affect much of the Southeast coastline the next several days.

Charleston, South Carolina, is forecast to see major coastal flooding with the Saturday morning and Sunday morning high tides.

At these levels, widespread flooding occurs in downtown Charleston leaving numerous roads flooded and impacting some structures, according to the National Weather Service.

At least minor to moderate flooding is forecast in Charleston with each other morning and evening high tide through Monday.

Along the Georgia coast, flooding the next few mornings may reach levels high enough to inundate some parts of Tybee Island.

Saturday morning's high tide at Ft. Pulaski could near levels measured during an October 1947 Category 2 hurricane, possibly inundate highway 80 between Tybee Island and Savannah and flood buildings on Tybee Island, according to the National Weather Service.

Significant coastal flooding is forecast along the northeast Florida coast, including around the Jacksonville area. Moderate to major coastal flooding is expected along the Atlantic coast of northeast Florida with the Saturday morning high tide. These areas could see an inundation of 3 to 4 feet above normally dry ground, according to the NWS.

Farther north, water levels will peak on Sunday or Monday.

In North Carolina, major flooding is possible with Sunday morning's high tide in the northern Outer Banks.

And in Virginia, moderate coastal flooding is possible Sunday and again on Monday in the Virginia Tidewater area around Norfolk and Newport News as northeast winds push water toward those areas.

Coastal flooding should gradually subside early next week, however, swells generating high surf and rip currents at the beaches could last into Tuesday or even Wednesday from the Virginia Tidewater to Florida's Atlantic beaches.

Rainfall could only add to the flood threat in some areas. The low pressure system will deliver a soaking for much of northeast Florida, the eastern Carolinas into Georgia this weekend.

Parts of northeast Florida and eastern North Carolina could pick up over an inch of rain through Sunday. With water pushing from the ocean toward beaches, rivers won't be able to drain heavy rain as well, potentially leading to additional flooding.

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

See the size of the Native American population in South Carolina

More than 5 million Native Americans live in the United States as members of 574 federally recognized and 63 state-recognized tribes. That number is projected...

More than 5 million Native Americans live in the United States as members of 574 federally recognized and 63 state-recognized tribes. That number is projected to rise to 10 million by 2060. A federally recognized tribe is a sovereign entity with a government-to-government relationship with the United States, as well as the rights of self-governance in such areas as tribal law and taxation.

About half of Native Americans live on reservations, of which there are about 326, comprising roughly 56.2 million acres. The 16 million-acre Navajo Nation Reservation in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah is the largest, and the 1.32-acre Pit River Tribe cemetery in California is the smallest.

Stacker ranked the states with the biggest Native American populations and looked at some of the characteristics and conditions for each community, analyzing data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2019 American Community Survey one-year estimate. The U.S. Census Bureau’s definition of “Native Americans” includes Alaskan Natives but excludes Native Hawaiians.

Keep reading to find out the size of the Native American population in your state, or see the national list here.

South Carolina by the numbers

– Native American population: 18,971– Proportion of state’s population: 0.4% (#35 highest among all states)

More than a half-dozen tribes have state recognition in South Carolina, among them the Beaver Creek, Edisto Natchez Kusso, Pee Dee, and Waccamaw. The sole federally recognized tribe, the Catawba, has a reservation near Rock Hill. In 2020, the federal government approved the Catawba’s use of 16 acres across the border in North Carolina, where the tribe plans to build an entertainment and casino complex. The plan is opposed by the Eastern Band of Cherokee, which operates two casinos in the western part of North Carolina and say investments and jobs would be threatened by the competition.

Compared with other U.S. races, American Indians have a life expectancy that is shorter by more than five years. The suicide rate among American Indian youth is 2.5 times higher than among youth in the rest of the country. American Indians are 2.5 times more likely to experience violent crimes than the national average, and more than four out of five American Indian women will experience violence in their lifetimes. Holistically, these issues can be seen as symptoms of several larger issues, including access to social services, educational opportunities, nutritional food, and health care. Property rights pose more significant problems, insomuch as residents who don’t have deeds to the land on which they live struggle to build credit, which throws a significant barrier in front of upward mobility. Meanwhile, tribal lands are tough sells for franchises and other commercial developers that would bring jobs to reservations, as these companies are often resistant to negotiating contract terms under tribal law.

One effort to mitigate the aforementioned statistics came with the 1968 establishment of the American Indian Movement (AIM) in Minnesota, which advocated for sovereignty and rights. The group famously occupied the Wounded Knee battle site at the Pine Ridge Reservation for more than two months in 1973.

Rep. Deb Haaland, a member of the Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico, has since been tapped to head the U.S. Department of Interior for President Joe Biden’s administration, becoming the first Indigenous cabinet secretary in the nation. Among her responsibilities will be the underfunded Bureau of Indian Education and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the latter of which oversees 55 million acres of tribal land.

Read on to see the states with the biggest and smallest Native American populations.

States with the biggest Native American populations

#1. Arizona: 332,273 Native American individuals#2. California: 321,112 Native American individuals#3. Oklahoma: 316,929 Native American individuals

States with the smallest Native American populations

#1. New Hampshire: 1,727 Native American individuals#2. Washington, D.C.: 1,886 Native American individuals#3. Vermont: 2,928 Native American individuals

What Others Say: Recognizing Native American contributions

Didn’t know there was such a month? Native Americans say that’s part of the problem. Too little focus is given by government, media and people in general to them as a minority and issues pertaining to Native Americans. They contend not enough is known and taught about their history.South Carolina officially recognizes locally the Santee Indian Organization and the Beaver Creek Indians, as well as the Pine Hill Indian Community Development Initiative. In addition to the Catawbas and the Edisto Natchez-Kusso Tribe of South C...

Didn’t know there was such a month? Native Americans say that’s part of the problem. Too little focus is given by government, media and people in general to them as a minority and issues pertaining to Native Americans. They contend not enough is known and taught about their history.

South Carolina officially recognizes locally the Santee Indian Organization and the Beaver Creek Indians, as well as the Pine Hill Indian Community Development Initiative. In addition to the Catawbas and the Edisto Natchez-Kusso Tribe of South Carolina, the others are:

• The PeeDee Indian Nation of Upper South Carolina

• The PAIA Lower Eastern Cherokee Nation of South Carolina

• The Sumter Tribe of Cheraw Indians

• The Wassamasaw Tribe of Varnertown Indians

The Catawbas are the largest tribe in South Carolina and the only federally recognized tribe.

There is news regarding three of the tribes to share during this special month.

Congresswoman Nancy Mace of South Carolina’s 1st District wants a second tribe to have federal recognition. She has introduced legislation to extend recognition to the Edisto Natchez-Kusso Tribe.

“As we celebrate National Native American Heritage Month, I’m introducing legislation to federally recognize a distinguished group of indigenous people in our district,” Mace said. “The Natchez-Kusso tribe have been a part of this land long before America existed as a country.”

“This is a long overdue first step in granting recognition this Lowcountry tribe deserves.”

Meanwhile, 6th District Congressman James Clyburn is sponsoring the Catawba Indian Nation Lands Act that reaffirms the Department of the Interior’s recognition of Catawba Indian Nation’s historical and ancestral ties to the lands in Kings Mountain and the Catawba Nation’s right to conduct gaming operations on those lands under the terms of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act.

And on a sad note, the Santee Indian Chief Randy Anthony Crummie, 62, of Holly Hill, died on Oct. 25.

For November’s observance, S.C. Gov. Henry McMaster’s proclamation acknowledged the contributions of Native Americans to the state and country, vowing to maintain their history, culture, lifestyles and unique heritage.

South Carolinians should be aware they can do more to make that reality.

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