Vape Shop in Summerville, SC | #1 Smoke/Vape Store | Smape Shop

10150 Dorchester Rd Suite 214 Summerville, SC 29485

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Vape Shop in Summerville, SC

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Your Go-To Vape Shop in Summerville, SC

Welcome to The Smape Shop, where the worlds of smoking and vaping come together to give you the best buzz in the Lowcountry! As a locally owned smoke shop in Summerville, we have built our reputation on sourcing the finest smoking accessories and vaping products in the industry. As experts in our trade, our goal is to give you the very best vape and smoke shop experience in South Carolina. That way, you leave feeling happy, informed, and excited about your new purchase. It doesn’t matter if you’re in town for the weekend or we see you regularly. Our customers receive the same personalized, boutique service every time they walk through the front door.

Our loyal customers keep coming back to the Smape Shop because we offer the following services:

  • Free Shipping – Yes, you read that right. Buy a product from the Smape Shop, and shipping is on us!
  • Low Prices – We will beat the price on any listed competitive product in South Carolina.
  • Warranties – All manufacturer warranties are guaranteed when you purchase a product from the Smape Shop.
  • Easy Returns – All Smape Shop products are guaranteed returnable within 30 days of your purchase if you experience a manufacturer defect.
  • Easy Shopping – Our team of friendly, knowledgeable vape and smoke experts makes your life easy and irie. Have a question? We’ve got an answer for you.
  • User Services – We make it a priority to educate all of our customers on how to use our products.

At the end of the day, we know that life is hard. We’re here to make it more bearable, one puff at a time.

What is Vaping?

Thirty years ago, the idea of an electronic cigarette seemed like something out of a sci-fi movie. Enjoy nicotine without having to burn tobacco? That’s nonsense!

Today, vaping is one of the most popular ways to “smoke,” with Euromonitor estimating that 55 million people worldwide enjoy tobacco-free devices. If you’re reading this page, chances are you’re well-versed in the world of vaping. But for those who aren’t, let’s get you caught up.

Typically, adults vape by using battery-operated devices called “vapes” or “e-cigarettes,” which are used to inhale a vapor. This vapor usually contains nicotine and other flavorings. Puffing on the vape engages the battery-powered heating device, which turns the liquid into an aerosol or vapor, which users enjoy in a variety of potencies. Adults vape for many different reasons, most commonly for the wide selection of flavors, their ability to be used inside, and their use in cigarette smoking cessation.

There are a few main components in almost every vaping device. Check out the breakdown below or ask your

What is Vaping?
Battery

Battery

The vape’s battery is its primary energy source and is used to power the atomizer. The battery is the most essential part of any vaporizer product because it provides the power needed to heat the coil. The vape battery generates power, the coil heats liquid, wax, or herb, and vapor is formed. Without the battery, your vaping device won’t work. Not all vaping batteries are the same, so be sure to select one with enough power for your needs. More on that later.

Atomizer

Atomizer

The atomizer’s job is to heat e-liquid, which turns the liquid into vapor.

E-Liquid

E-Liquid

Also known as e-juice, this substance is inserted into a vape and gives the vapor its flavor and nicotine. Today, there several varieties of e-juices to choose from, which give vapers the chance to experiment with various flavors.

Cartridge

Cartridge

The cartridge is a small container that holds vape juice or e-liquids. This container is sealed from the heating coils of your vape and only touches the wick. When you visit the Smape Shop, ask your vape expert about our disposable and reusable vape cartridges!

Wick

Wick

Typically made of cotton fibers, the wick gets saturated with e-juice from the container. The oil moves along the fibers of the cotton until it comes into touches the e-coils. Vapor is produced and inhaled when the heated e-coils and the wick touch.

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SUB OHM TANK AND MOD

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mAh¬ and Your Vape Battery

Many e-devices within our vape shop in Summerville, SC come with a built-in battery. However, these batteries vary in power. You can find out how powerful the battery is by looking at its mAh, or Milliamp Hour. In the world of vaping, mAh refers to how much energy the vaporizer’s battery can store on a single, complete charge. The higher the mAh, the more energy can be stored in the battery. With a higher mAh, you will be able to use your vape or e-cigarette longer without charging. The mAh number is important to look at, especially if you’ll be traveling and won’t have access to a power outlet or charging station. If you’re always out and about, pick a vape with a higher mAh. If you’re only using your e-device at home, you may not need to have a high mAh.

What are the Different Types of Vaping Devices?

Vapes come in a wide range of models and forms. Some vapes need to be filled with e-liquid, while others require cartridges. There are also more advanced vapes on the market, sometimes referred to as Box Mods or just Mods. These devices often include modifications to battery power or cartridge size. Vape devices are generally categorized into one of three generations. However, some vapers are now adding a fourth generation to account for advances in vaping technology.

Cig-a-Likes (First Generation)

Made to mimic the size and look of traditional cigarettes, this first-gen vape is heavier than a regular cigarette. It will often have an LED light on the end, which illuminates when the user inhales. If you are new to vaping or e-cigarettes, cig-a-likes may be the first thing that comes to mind. These vaping devices are usually inexpensive and easy to use. Some cig-a-likes are considered disposable, meaning you throw them away after the battery dies. Others are rechargeable and have replaceable cartridges.

Mid-Size E-Cigarettes (Second Generation)

Larger than cig-a-likes, mid-size vapes have been said to resemble laser pointers. These devices usually have a button, which users press while inhaling. Mid-size vaporizers often have larger battery capacities and last longer than cig-a-likes. It’s common for the battery of a second-generation e-cigarette to feature a threaded connection which is compatible with several atomizers. For added customization, some mid-size e-cigs allow the user to adjust the voltage for more power.

Advanced Personal Vapes (Third Generation)

These advanced vaporizers are larger and bulkier than second-generation vapes. They are also more complicated from a technical standpoint and can come with modifications. Some mods include longer lasting batteries and have a higher refill capacity. These advancements aren't available on first and second-generation vaporizers. If you’re new to vaping, ask one of our experienced Smape Shop employees for more info on the AVPs we have in stock.

Innovative Regulated Mods (Fourth Generation)

Historically, vaporizers have been classified into three generations. However, new technology has led to the creation of a fourth generation by some vape users. This generation features more powerful and highly advanced mods. Some features include temperature controls, rebuildable tanks, adjustable airflow slots, and dual airflow slots, to name a few.

Vape mods typically come in two forms:

  • Mechanical Vape Mods:

    Regulated mods are complex modifications that involve modifying the vaporizer's voltage or wattage output. They often have features like resistance meters and safety additions like reverse battery polarity protection. These mods are most often used by experienced vapers.

  • Regulated Vape Mods:

    Regulated mods are complex modifications that involve modifying the vaporizer's voltage or wattage output. They often have features like resistance meters and safety additions like reverse battery polarity protection. These mods are most often used by experienced vapers.

Which Vape is Right for Me?

If you’re new to vaping, it can be hard to pick a device. With hundreds of choices available, you may not know where to start. Don’t stress, though: we’ve got a breakdown to help you out.

Cig-a-Likes

  • Who Should Buy Cig-a-Likes:

    These first-gen vapes are great for folks who might be trying to kick traditional cigarettes. They are small, portable, and often are designed to look like tobacco cigarettes. They have a mouth-to-lung inhalation process, allowing the user to puff on the vape like a traditional cigarette without the smell. They are also free of the harsh toxins and chemicals often found in cigarettes, making them a great choice if you’re trying to quit conventional smoking.

  • Who Shouldn’t Buy Cig-a-Likes:

    These first-gen vapes are great for folks who might be trying to kick traditional cigarettes. They are small, portable, and often are designed to look like tobacco cigarettes. They have a mouth-to-lung inhalation process, allowing the user to puff on the vape like a traditional cigarette without the smell. They are also free of the harsh toxins and chemicals often found in cigarettes, making them a great choice if you’re trying to quit conventional smoking.

Advanced Personal Vapes

  • Who Should Buy AVPs:

    AVPs (or box mods) are highly customizable, so if you like to have more control over your vaping experience, an AVP could be the way to go. These devices are great for all vaping styles and often come equipped with a longer battery life with both mouth-to-lung and direct-to-lung variants.

  • Who Shouldn’t Buy AVPs:

    If you prefer an all-in-one package with little-to-no assembly, an APV isn’t for you. If you’re a newer vaper, understand that AVPs have a higher learning curve. So, if you just want something easy to vape, a box mod might not be the best fit for your needs.

Mid-Size Vapes and Vape Pens

  • Who Should Buy Vape Pens:

    Pens usually come with a battery, tank, and safety features that shut off the vape after a few seconds. These rechargeable devices offer both mouth-to-lung and direct-to-lung options. If you like ease of convenience and portability, a vape pen might be your best bet.

  • Who Shouldn’t Use Vape Pens:

    These vapes have a shorter battery life than AVPs. Many require the user to clean the e-juice tank. If you don’t want to take the time to clean your device, this style of vape isn’t right for you.

Smape Shop Pro Tip

If you’re anything like us, you may prefer to speak with a real-life person about your vaping options. We recommend that all new vape users swing by our vape shop in Summerville, SC. When you swing by and say hi, you will have the opportunity to see our vapes up close, hold them, and get more information from our team of vaping experts.

Contact Us

One-Stop Smoke Shop in Summerville, SC

If “vape life” just isn’t for you, don’t worry – we’ve got a HUGE selection of smoking accessories for you to choose from when you visit the Smape Shop. Whether you’re looking for a brand-new waterpipe to ring in the weekend or need tobacco to roll your own cigarettes, we’ve got you covered.

Some of our most popular smoke shop products include:

Dab Rigs
Dab Straws
Hookas
Classic Tobacco Pipes
Cigarillos
Blunt Wraps
Cones
Cigars
Kratom
CBD

We only carry the best name brands for you to choose from, like White Owl, Dutch Master, Backwoods, Al Capone, and many more. Have questions about a product? Curious where a particular waterpipe was created? Our knowledgeable staff is ready to answer all of your questions. Our goal is to make your time with us easy, so you can focus on having a good time without feeling pressured to purchase until you’re ready. So, go ahead and “roll up” to our store – you’ll be happy you did!

Thank you for your support! Ask about our loyalty program to save $10 on a $20 purchase upon loyalty card completion.
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Latest News in Summerville

This Weekend, Celebrate Sweet Tea in the South Carolina Town That Invented It

The two best places in the world to enjoy sweet tea are: 1. your front porch; and 2. Summerville, South Carolina.Each year, the town known as the "Birthplace of Sweet Tea," celebrates the beloved beverage with its very own festival, which is currently in full swing outside Charleston.The w...

The two best places in the world to enjoy sweet tea are: 1. your front porch; and 2. Summerville, South Carolina.

Each year, the town known as the "Birthplace of Sweet Tea," celebrates the beloved beverage with its very own festival, which is currently in full swing outside Charleston.

The week-long Summerville Sweet Tea Festival transforms historic downtown Summerville into a massive street fair complete with food trucks, artisanal vendors, and live entertainment. This year's fun began Monday and culminates Saturday, September 18.

Organizers with Summerville Dream told Post & Courier that this year's festival was inspired by pandemic-related revisions made to last year's event, when the festival was transformed from a one-day gathering into the "Sweetest Week Ever" to allow for social distancing.

"Last year we got creative and spread it out over a few days and we called it the 'sweetest week ever,'" Steve Doniger, executive director of Summerville Dream and festival organizer, told the paper. "Well, that was so popular, and we had such a great turnout that we are actually doing that again this year, and we have expanded that a little bit."

Over the past decade, Summerville has broken a world record for the world's largest sweet tea, and set up a Sweet Tea Trail featuring businesses that offer sweet tea-inspired specials like sweet tea cupcakes, sweet tea cinnamon rolls, sweet tea jelly, a sweet tea pork chop sandwich, and even a sweet tea brined chicken salad.

But Summerville hasn't been recognized as the official "Birthplace of Sweet Tea" for long. For decades, the drink was believed to have been invented in St. Louis at the World's Fair in 1904. Everything changed, however, when a list of items purchased for a reunion of old soldiers near Summerville, which included 600 pounds of sugar and 880 gallons of iced tea, was discovered from 1890.

"We started sharing the history that we thought was so charming," Summerville tourism director Tina Zimmerman told the Post & Courier. "I think great things have come from it."

For more information on the Summerville Sweet Tea Festival and a full schedule of events, visit SummervilleDream.org/sweet-tea-festival.

Joe Pye reflects on his time as Dorchester District 2 superintendent, set to retire in 2022

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – After decades of leading education in Dorchester District 2, Superintendent Joe Pye announced his plans to retire at the end of the school year.“I announced that after 52 years,” said Pye. “A very emotional decision, but I decided it was time for me to retire.”Pye believes he, and the distri...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – After decades of leading education in Dorchester District 2, Superintendent Joe Pye announced his plans to retire at the end of the school year.

“I announced that after 52 years,” said Pye. “A very emotional decision, but I decided it was time for me to retire.”

Pye believes he, and the district, are in a good place. “We just moved into this district office and it was the last of the building projects from the referendum we did some years ago,” he said.

Ironically, when Pye moved into the new office a few weeks ago, he moved into the same place he taught when he took his first job in Dorchester District 2 as a teacher. His officer area was his classroom back then, at what was called Rollins Elementary.

“I love teaching, I just love the process of teaching,” he said. “But I love the interaction with kids.”

But it’s time for other things now.

“I have a 95-year-old father who needs looking after. Also, I haven’t had any family time—my whole life has been the school system,” he said.

Some of his biggest adjustments were when he started with the district. Learning to relate to high school students and teachers. His teaching background was with younger students.

“And the pandemic, of course, brought on new challenges,” he said.

He shared some of his proudest moments: “Probably my greatest, some of the greatest successes, passing that referendum years ago. The Bellmore Score was important. I was named Superintendent of the Year a few years back, that was quite an honor for me.”

Then having a school named after him tops the cake — Joe Pye Elementary.

Pye said he is leaving whoever takes over in good hands. “There will be a supporting cast here that is second to none. I have the best staff. And of course, when getting out to the schools, I have the best teachers. We have fantastic teachers.”

So, what’s next?

“I’ll be honest with you; I had this thing last night I know I would love to teach again. But at my age, 74, I guess if they get desperate and they can’t find someone.”

What does he hope people think of as they remember the 52 years that Joe Pye spent in education? “This man dedicated his whole life to this job, giving 100%. Never forgetting where I came from,” he said.

But perhaps traveling with his wife, Patsy, will suffice.

Pye will continue to be the superintendent here in Dorchester District 2 until the end of the school year.

Dorchester Paws in ‘dire need’ of adoptions and fosters

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCBD)- Community pet shelter Dorchester Paws has issued a temporary moratorium, closing their admissions department until Sunday.According to Marketing and Development Director Danielle Zuck, the shelter has taken in 748 dogs and cats since September 1. That is an average of 15 animals per day, resulting in the shelter being at max capacity.A full shelter means Dorchester Paws no longer has space for new animals and had to issue a temporary moratorium on animal intake on Tuesday, an action which Zuck said is ...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCBD)- Community pet shelter Dorchester Paws has issued a temporary moratorium, closing their admissions department until Sunday.

According to Marketing and Development Director Danielle Zuck, the shelter has taken in 748 dogs and cats since September 1. That is an average of 15 animals per day, resulting in the shelter being at max capacity.

A full shelter means Dorchester Paws no longer has space for new animals and had to issue a temporary moratorium on animal intake on Tuesday, an action which Zuck said is the last resort.

“For us to have to say no as an open-admission shelter, it’s urgent,” Zuck said. “We are in dire need of adopters and fosters.”

Dorchester Paws is an open-admission shelter, meaning it takes in every lost, abandoned, or abused animal and houses them until they find a forever home. The shelter is also a partner in “No Kill South Carolina,” an initiative aimed at creating “an infrastructure for humane animal welfare organizations in order to optimize quality of care and maximize lifesaving of healthy, treatable canines and felines in South Carolina.”

Zuck noted that another challenge facing the shelter is funding. It costs an average of $35 per animal, the first day they are with Dorchester Paws. With 748 animals currently in its care, it costs $26,180 at a minimum to care for the animals.

“We don’t have the funding,” she said. “We get food donated and we get supplies as much as we can donated, but we’re still low on some things.”

Dorchester Paws is calling on Lowcountry residents to consider adoption or fostering. In an effort to encourage this, the shelter has launched a “Name Your Own Adoption Fee” campaign for all dogs, cats, and kittens, excluding puppies. Zuck said the shelter does ask for at least a minimum of $5 for adoptions. Until the shelter intake reopens, Dorchester Paws is offering supplies and resources for those who keep an animal.

“For you to get a $5, $10, $15 animal that’s ready to go, that’s awesome,” she said. “We are not closing our doors but we are literally SOSing, we don’t know what else to do.”

Currently, there are about a dozen seniors (dogs over the age of 7) on the shelter’s adoption floor. Senior dogs tend to be adopted at a 50% slower rate than any other age, according to Zuck.

“We are asking people to give the animals a shelter break, just foster them for a week or two,” she said. “Get them out because shelter life is no life for any animal.”

Dorchester Paws hopes to end the moratorium on Monday at 12 PM, but Zuck said they will need to clear out at least half of the shelter to do so.

Below are some of the animals currently available for adoption:

All photos courtesy of Dorchester Paws

The current “Name Your Own Adoption Fee” campaign will end on November 7.

Summerville leaders select town’s new administrator

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Summerville Town Council voted late Wednesday afternoon to offer the town administrator job to a former town employee.Council members selected Lisa Wallace, the current assistant city manager for Myrtle Beach, and approved a three-year contract.“Lisa’s local government experience and previous service to the Town gives myself and council a sense of familiarity as we move forward,” Summerville Mayor Ricky Waring said. “Her qualifications, professionalism, and leadership skills pro...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Summerville Town Council voted late Wednesday afternoon to offer the town administrator job to a former town employee.

Council members selected Lisa Wallace, the current assistant city manager for Myrtle Beach, and approved a three-year contract.

“Lisa’s local government experience and previous service to the Town gives myself and council a sense of familiarity as we move forward,” Summerville Mayor Ricky Waring said. “Her qualifications, professionalism, and leadership skills prove that she’s the best person for this job. I’m proud to welcome her back to Summerville.”

Wallace worked for the town of Summerville from 1996 to 2016, serving in a number of roles including clerk, treasurer, assistant town administrator, director of administrative services and special assistant to the mayor, Summerville town spokesperson Mary Edwards said.

Wallace served as the city manager for the city of York from 2016 to 2019, when she took the assistance city manager role in Myrtle Beach.

“I’m excited to be back in Summerville and grateful to council for the opportunity to serve as town administrator,” Wallace said late Wednesday. “I appreciate the trust and confidence in being selected for this position and will work to maintain and improve the outstanding quality of life we have in Summerville.”

The position will pay $170,000 and her first day on the job will be July 8, Edwards said.

Council made the selection days after a vote during a special meeting on Saturday to terminate the town’s contract with its former administrator, Rebecca Vance. Vance was hired as the town’s administrator on Jan. 31, 2020. However, nearly a year and six months into her contract, the mayor and town council members voted to fire her immediately and without cause, according to draft minutes of Saturday’s meeting.

There are still a lot of unanswered questions about why Vance was let go. Saturday’s special-called meeting was announced just over 24 hours before council members would gather to terminate her contract.

According to meeting minutes, all but two of the town’s council members voted to end her time in the role.

Most of the council members wanted to fire Vance because they believed Vance was taking the town in a different direction than what the mayor or council wanted.

One council member, Terry Jenkins, said he believed “there was a fundamental and philosophical difference between the Town Administrator and the Mayor and Council in dealings with daily interactions with Council and staff.”

Council member Bill McIntosh said he voted to terminate without cause “because he believes that the Town Administrator was not a good fit for this Council,” and council member Aaron Brown stated “there was a dichotomy between the Administrator and Mayor/Council as to who was in charge of the Town.”

Council members Kim Garten-Schmidt and Bob Jackson voted against the termination, and Jackson also voted against meeting in executive session on Saturday to discuss Vance’s termination.

“He did not think it was right to call a meeting on a Saturday morning when there was no time to get all of the facts regarding the issue,” draft meeting minutes stated.

Vance’s contract was signed on Jan. 31, 2020, but her term didn’t officially begin until March 9, 2020, according to her contract. She was set to remain as the town’s administrator for three years and make an annual gross salary of $165,000.

According to meeting minutes, Vance’s contract was terminated by the town involuntarily. Her contract states that the town must pay her a lump sum payment in the amount equal to her gross salary and benefits, “which would normally be paid over a period of one hundred eighty days.” Town officials have not yet released how much that amount will be.

The Summerville town council gathered Saturday morning to fire Vance while she was in Myrtle Beach for a meeting of the South Carolina City and County Managers Association. She was chosen during that meeting by the association’s members to lead as its president. Allison Burkey with the SCCCMA said Vance will remain president as there didn’t seem to be any ethical misconduct with her termination as Summerville’s town administrator.

“We allow the manager up to a year to be searching for a new position if they are in a director or officer position,” Burkey said.

In a press release from the town of Summerville announcing Vance’s hiring last year, Mayor Ricky Waring acknowledged Vance’s experience.

“Rebecca Vance has a strong background in local government and administrator experience,” Waring said in 2020. “Council is impressed with her qualifications, leadership experience, and high ethical standards. We look forward to the tremendous amount of value, transparency, and innovation she’ll bring to Summerville.”

Before her time as the town’s administrator, Vance served as the Deputy Administrator of Community Services for Dorchester County. She also served as the City Manager of Cayce, the City Administrator of Manning, and the Town Administrator of Summerton. “She also worked for the Berkeley Charleston Dorchester Council of Governments and the Sumter City-County Planning Commission earlier in her career,” the press released stated.

“I’m honored to work in Summerville with a council that’s passionate about their people and with a staff that values teamwork and service,” Vance said in 2020. “I appreciate the trust and confidence in being selected for this position. I look forward to giving back to a community that has given me so much throughout my life.”

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

After being postponed for a year, Summerville’s Flowertown Festival returns

SUMMERVILLE — The global pandemic meant the cancellation of one of South Carolina’s largest events, the Flowertown Festival.Now with the event’s October return, many are hoping the festival also allows the community to connect again.“It’s something we’ve done my whole life,” DeeAnn Farrell, a lifelong Summerville resident and owner of Fancy Trimmins Embroidery, said. “It’s definitely a community event.”In a non-pandemic year, the Flowertown Festival brings more ...

SUMMERVILLE — The global pandemic meant the cancellation of one of South Carolina’s largest events, the Flowertown Festival.

Now with the event’s October return, many are hoping the festival also allows the community to connect again.

“It’s something we’ve done my whole life,” DeeAnn Farrell, a lifelong Summerville resident and owner of Fancy Trimmins Embroidery, said. “It’s definitely a community event.”

In a non-pandemic year, the Flowertown Festival brings more than 200,000 locals and tourists to the Summerville area for a weekend of festivities. Started in 1973, it’s an event organized by the Summerville Family YMCA that includes vendors, food trucks, carnival rides and art showcases.

The festival usually takes place in the spring, celebrating all of the blooming flowers. Because of the pandemic, and to avoid another year of missing out on the festival, it will take place in the fall. This year’s event will be Oct. 8-10.

The year 2020 marked the first time the event had been canceled in 48 years.

If you think you can save some money by skimping on your auto insurance coverage in South Carolina, it might be a good idea to reassess your priorities

For some it meant going without a major tradition in a year that saw countless other traditions get skipped. For the Summerville YMCA, it meant missing out on its largest fundraiser and an estimated $100,000-plus.

So the event’s return is extremely welcomed, organizers said.

“We’re pretty excited,” said Kim Caughell, vice president of community relations for the Summerville YMCA.

Pandemic differences

While the blooming azaleas won’t be present at this year’s festival, a lot of familiar activities will be around. These include the many vendors and art showcases.

It’s what Caughell said she enjoys most about the event. The festival acts as an opportunity to showcase all of the different businesses and activities Summerville has to offer, she said.

“It really is all about being able to highlight all the other nonprofits and local businesses,” Caughell said.

Many organizations throughout the years have used the event as a marketing opportunity. With the pandemic, some have had to adjust to find news ways to connect with people differently, such as through social media.

The 2021 festival is expected to add to that connectivity.

“It’s another way for them to get exposure,” said Rita Berry, president and CEO of the Greater Summerville/Dorchester County Chamber of Commerce. “We love having people come and discover Summerville.”

When the 2020 festival was canceled, Caughell said, organizers realized just how impactful the event was to so many different groups in the area.

Usually around 300 arts-and-crafts vendors attend the event, selling hundreds of items often specifically made for the festival. Around 150 businesses also attend.

“They depend on that marketing to get them through the whole year,” Caughell said.

The event also helps the Summerville YMCA fund local need-based scholarships and programs for the community.

The organization is expecting half of the usual number of vendors this year.

“We did that so we could space them out,” Caughell said.

Some regular vendors had other plans around the time of the October festival, so they can’t make the event. Others also had items that would only be available in the spring.

With it being in October, organizers said attendees can expect more Christmas items on sale. They’re also expecting lower temperatures in comparison to when the event is held either in March or April.

Another difference this year will be COVID safety measures. Hand sanitizer and hand-washing stations will be scattered through the festival grounds.

The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control is also slated to offer COVID-19 vaccines at the festival.

Mask-wearing will be encouraged, but since the event is outdoors, organizers said they’re hoping people will be able to space out.

Other than that, attendees can expect the usual restaurant vendors and activities for kids like the Children’s Jubilee. More than 200 artists will also have their works on display for purchase.

“I am glad to see the Flowertown Festival return,” Mayor Ricky Waring said. “I hope everyone stays safe and enjoys the festival.”

Though doing the event in the fall feels different, Caughell and others said they still expect it to capture the same magic that the festival has in the spring.

Years of tradition

This year will not be the first time the flowers have not been in bloom at the festival.

Farrell has attended the event since its second year. She was 2 at the time. She said there have been plenty of years when the flowers have not been there in the spring because of rainy weather.

But she also said she still expects to hear about people making calls to find out where the flowers of Flowertown Festival are located.

In her experience, she said, the flowers are just a bonus. When they’re not there, the festival is still a good time, she said.

“I don’t think it takes away from the festival,” she said.

Farrell’s parents were vendors at the event when she was a child. That’s how she first got connected to it.

Today, she is not only a longtime vendor at the festival, but her business, Fancy Trimmins, also makes and sells the official Flowertown Festival T-shirts.

As a business owner, she said, the event always makes for good advertising. Fancy Trimmins isn’t located on Main Street, so the festival helps people become familiar with the business, she said.

When the festival is in the spring, the business often sells Easter-themed items. This year, Farrell said she’s excited to display their Christmas items.

“This is going to be different being in the fall,” she said.

What makes the event so special to her is the opportunity to see and connect with people. This year feels especially important because of all the distance the pandemic created, she said.

The best way she said she can describe the festival is that it’s just a place where people are going to be able to see one another.

“There’s been so little of that,” she said.

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