Vape Shop in West Ashley, SC | #1 Smoke/Vape Store | Smape Shop

10150 Dorchester Rd Suite 214 Summerville, SC 29485

  • Image 01
  • Image 02
  • Image 03

Vape Shop in West Ashley, SC

Ask us Anything

Quick Quote

Your Go-To Vape Shop in West Ashley, SC

Welcome to The Smape Shop, where the worlds of smoking and vaping come together to give you the best buzz in the Lowcountry! As a locally owned smoke shop in West Ashley, we have built our reputation on sourcing the finest smoking accessories and vaping products in the industry. As experts in our trade, our goal is to give you the very best vape and smoke shop experience in South Carolina. That way, you leave feeling happy, informed, and excited about your new purchase. It doesn’t matter if you’re in town for the weekend or we see you regularly. Our customers receive the same personalized, boutique service every time they walk through the front door.

Our loyal customers keep coming back to the Smape Shop because we offer the following services:

  • Free Shipping – Yes, you read that right. Buy a product from the Smape Shop, and shipping is on us!
  • Low Prices – We will beat the price on any listed competitive product in South Carolina.
  • Warranties – All manufacturer warranties are guaranteed when you purchase a product from the Smape Shop.
  • Easy Returns – All Smape Shop products are guaranteed returnable within 30 days of your purchase if you experience a manufacturer defect.
  • Easy Shopping – Our team of friendly, knowledgeable vape and smoke experts makes your life easy and irie. Have a question? We’ve got an answer for you.
  • User Services – We make it a priority to educate all of our customers on how to use our products.

At the end of the day, we know that life is hard. We’re here to make it more bearable, one puff at a time.

What is Vaping?

Thirty years ago, the idea of an electronic cigarette seemed like something out of a sci-fi movie. Enjoy nicotine without having to burn tobacco? That’s nonsense!

Today, vaping is one of the most popular ways to “smoke,” with Euromonitor estimating that 55 million people worldwide enjoy tobacco-free devices. If you’re reading this page, chances are you’re well-versed in the world of vaping. But for those who aren’t, let’s get you caught up.

Typically, adults vape by using battery-operated devices called “vapes” or “e-cigarettes,” which are used to inhale a vapor. This vapor usually contains nicotine and other flavorings. Puffing on the vape engages the battery-powered heating device, which turns the liquid into an aerosol or vapor, which users enjoy in a variety of potencies. Adults vape for many different reasons, most commonly for the wide selection of flavors, their ability to be used inside, and their use in cigarette smoking cessation.

There are a few main components in almost every vaping device. Check out the breakdown below or ask your

What is Vaping?
Battery

Battery

The vape’s battery is its primary energy source and is used to power the atomizer. The battery is the most essential part of any vaporizer product because it provides the power needed to heat the coil. The vape battery generates power, the coil heats liquid, wax, or herb, and vapor is formed. Without the battery, your vaping device won’t work. Not all vaping batteries are the same, so be sure to select one with enough power for your needs. More on that later.

Atomizer

Atomizer

The atomizer’s job is to heat e-liquid, which turns the liquid into vapor.

E-Liquid

E-Liquid

Also known as e-juice, this substance is inserted into a vape and gives the vapor its flavor and nicotine. Today, there several varieties of e-juices to choose from, which give vapers the chance to experiment with various flavors.

Cartridge

Cartridge

The cartridge is a small container that holds vape juice or e-liquids. This container is sealed from the heating coils of your vape and only touches the wick. When you visit the Smape Shop, ask your vape expert about our disposable and reusable vape cartridges!

Wick

Wick

Typically made of cotton fibers, the wick gets saturated with e-juice from the container. The oil moves along the fibers of the cotton until it comes into touches the e-coils. Vapor is produced and inhaled when the heated e-coils and the wick touch.

Geek Vape Aegis X

SUB OHM TANK AND MOD

More info

Our Brands

mAh¬ and Your Vape Battery

Many e-devices within our vape shop in West Ashley, SC come with a built-in battery. However, these batteries vary in power. You can find out how powerful the battery is by looking at its mAh, or Milliamp Hour. In the world of vaping, mAh refers to how much energy the vaporizer’s battery can store on a single, complete charge. The higher the mAh, the more energy can be stored in the battery. With a higher mAh, you will be able to use your vape or e-cigarette longer without charging. The mAh number is important to look at, especially if you’ll be traveling and won’t have access to a power outlet or charging station. If you’re always out and about, pick a vape with a higher mAh. If you’re only using your e-device at home, you may not need to have a high mAh.

What are the Different Types of Vaping Devices?

Vapes come in a wide range of models and forms. Some vapes need to be filled with e-liquid, while others require cartridges. There are also more advanced vapes on the market, sometimes referred to as Box Mods or just Mods. These devices often include modifications to battery power or cartridge size. Vape devices are generally categorized into one of three generations. However, some vapers are now adding a fourth generation to account for advances in vaping technology.

Cig-a-Likes (First Generation)

Made to mimic the size and look of traditional cigarettes, this first-gen vape is heavier than a regular cigarette. It will often have an LED light on the end, which illuminates when the user inhales. If you are new to vaping or e-cigarettes, cig-a-likes may be the first thing that comes to mind. These vaping devices are usually inexpensive and easy to use. Some cig-a-likes are considered disposable, meaning you throw them away after the battery dies. Others are rechargeable and have replaceable cartridges.

Mid-Size E-Cigarettes (Second Generation)

Larger than cig-a-likes, mid-size vapes have been said to resemble laser pointers. These devices usually have a button, which users press while inhaling. Mid-size vaporizers often have larger battery capacities and last longer than cig-a-likes. It’s common for the battery of a second-generation e-cigarette to feature a threaded connection which is compatible with several atomizers. For added customization, some mid-size e-cigs allow the user to adjust the voltage for more power.

Advanced Personal Vapes (Third Generation)

These advanced vaporizers are larger and bulkier than second-generation vapes. They are also more complicated from a technical standpoint and can come with modifications. Some mods include longer lasting batteries and have a higher refill capacity. These advancements aren't available on first and second-generation vaporizers. If you’re new to vaping, ask one of our experienced Smape Shop employees for more info on the AVPs we have in stock.

Innovative Regulated Mods (Fourth Generation)

Historically, vaporizers have been classified into three generations. However, new technology has led to the creation of a fourth generation by some vape users. This generation features more powerful and highly advanced mods. Some features include temperature controls, rebuildable tanks, adjustable airflow slots, and dual airflow slots, to name a few.

Vape mods typically come in two forms:

  • Mechanical Vape Mods:

    Regulated mods are complex modifications that involve modifying the vaporizer's voltage or wattage output. They often have features like resistance meters and safety additions like reverse battery polarity protection. These mods are most often used by experienced vapers.

  • Regulated Vape Mods:

    Regulated mods are complex modifications that involve modifying the vaporizer's voltage or wattage output. They often have features like resistance meters and safety additions like reverse battery polarity protection. These mods are most often used by experienced vapers.

Which Vape is Right for Me?

If you’re new to vaping, it can be hard to pick a device. With hundreds of choices available, you may not know where to start. Don’t stress, though: we’ve got a breakdown to help you out.

Cig-a-Likes

  • Who Should Buy Cig-a-Likes:

    These first-gen vapes are great for folks who might be trying to kick traditional cigarettes. They are small, portable, and often are designed to look like tobacco cigarettes. They have a mouth-to-lung inhalation process, allowing the user to puff on the vape like a traditional cigarette without the smell. They are also free of the harsh toxins and chemicals often found in cigarettes, making them a great choice if you’re trying to quit conventional smoking.

  • Who Shouldn’t Buy Cig-a-Likes:

    These first-gen vapes are great for folks who might be trying to kick traditional cigarettes. They are small, portable, and often are designed to look like tobacco cigarettes. They have a mouth-to-lung inhalation process, allowing the user to puff on the vape like a traditional cigarette without the smell. They are also free of the harsh toxins and chemicals often found in cigarettes, making them a great choice if you’re trying to quit conventional smoking.

Advanced Personal Vapes

  • Who Should Buy AVPs:

    AVPs (or box mods) are highly customizable, so if you like to have more control over your vaping experience, an AVP could be the way to go. These devices are great for all vaping styles and often come equipped with a longer battery life with both mouth-to-lung and direct-to-lung variants.

  • Who Shouldn’t Buy AVPs:

    If you prefer an all-in-one package with little-to-no assembly, an APV isn’t for you. If you’re a newer vaper, understand that AVPs have a higher learning curve. So, if you just want something easy to vape, a box mod might not be the best fit for your needs.

Mid-Size Vapes and Vape Pens

  • Who Should Buy Vape Pens:

    Pens usually come with a battery, tank, and safety features that shut off the vape after a few seconds. These rechargeable devices offer both mouth-to-lung and direct-to-lung options. If you like ease of convenience and portability, a vape pen might be your best bet.

  • Who Shouldn’t Use Vape Pens:

    These vapes have a shorter battery life than AVPs. Many require the user to clean the e-juice tank. If you don’t want to take the time to clean your device, this style of vape isn’t right for you.

Smape Shop Pro Tip

If you’re anything like us, you may prefer to speak with a real-life person about your vaping options. We recommend that all new vape users swing by our vape shop in West Ashley, SC. When you swing by and say hi, you will have the opportunity to see our vapes up close, hold them, and get more information from our team of vaping experts.

Contact Us

One-Stop Smoke Shop in West Ashley, SC

If “vape life” just isn’t for you, don’t worry – we’ve got a HUGE selection of smoking accessories for you to choose from when you visit the Smape Shop. Whether you’re looking for a brand-new waterpipe to ring in the weekend or need tobacco to roll your own cigarettes, we’ve got you covered.

Some of our most popular smoke shop products include:

Dab Rigs
Dab Straws
Hookas
Classic Tobacco Pipes
Cigarillos
Blunt Wraps
Cones
Cigars
Kratom
CBD

We only carry the best name brands for you to choose from, like White Owl, Dutch Master, Backwoods, Al Capone, and many more. Have questions about a product? Curious where a particular waterpipe was created? Our knowledgeable staff is ready to answer all of your questions. Our goal is to make your time with us easy, so you can focus on having a good time without feeling pressured to purchase until you’re ready. So, go ahead and “roll up” to our store – you’ll be happy you did!

Thank you for your support! Ask about our loyalty program to save $10 on a $20 purchase upon loyalty card completion.
Free Quote

Latest News in West Ashley

Lowcountry small business owners encourage shoppers to buy local this holiday season

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – The best shopping weekend of the year is just a few days away and local small businesses are looking for a big boost on Small Business Saturday.The COVID-19 pandemic took a heavy toll on many local shops. Some are still catching up from pandemic shutdowns and others say business is booming.“I’d say over the course of the last six months, it’s been busier than we’ve ever been in our whole career,” said Gary Flynn, a partner, and CEO of M. Dumas and Sons on King Street...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – The best shopping weekend of the year is just a few days away and local small businesses are looking for a big boost on Small Business Saturday.

The COVID-19 pandemic took a heavy toll on many local shops. Some are still catching up from pandemic shutdowns and others say business is booming.

“I’d say over the course of the last six months, it’s been busier than we’ve ever been in our whole career,” said Gary Flynn, a partner, and CEO of M. Dumas and Sons on King Street in Downtown Charleston.

He says the pandemic threatened the survival of the shop that has been in business for over 100 years.

As for Brackish in West Ashley, co-founder Jeff Plotner says 2021 has been a good year overall.

“We started to see it at the end of last year, that renewed demand,” said Plotner.

Even with the cash rolling in for some small businesses, other challenges still face the shops. Most of them stem from the supply chain bottleneck. Plotner says certain products they use, like the wooden boxes they package their handmade bowties and earrings in, come from overseas.

“It’s just something that we’ve had to plan ahead for with our purchasing and inventory teams,” said Plotner.

Over at M. Dumas and Sons, certain brands are having more issues than others depending on their country of origin.

A report from business.org shows over 80% of businesses have had to raise their prices this year to combat inflation. We asked if the findings of the report reflected changes within Brackish or M. Dumas and Sons.

“We will hold our prices as long as the prices that we’re being charged are being held,” explained Flynn. “There will be some increases though. I’m seeing it more for spring than I’m seeing for this season, but for future orders, I’m seeing that supply chain really having a hard time catching up.”

“I think it’s always something that’s in the conversation and we are actually looking at that right now,” said Plotner.

Both owners, as well as many others in the Lowcountry and encouraging people to shop local this holiday season and all year round.

“Being in a small business, being a part owner, doing everything ourselves, the blood sweat, and tears are here and they’re all people that live in your community. It’s a wonderful thing to be able to support the community,” said Flynn.

“Local businesses are the fiber of the community. You think about Charleston, South Carolina, and every other town for that matter, they have their own original differences and things that make them unique and give them their own character and such a big part of that is the local businesses,” said Plotner.

According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, Americans spent nearly $20 billion on Small Business Saturday last year. The National Retail Federation says holiday shopping this year has the potential to shatter previous records.

SC Basketball Coaches Association releases preseason rankings, top seniors

Brookland-Cayce High School held the annual SC Basketball Coaches Association Media Day Wednesday.The event served to highlight the preseason top 10 rankings in each classification. The Association also released its list of the top seniors in each classification, as well as an Elite Player list for both girls and boys.Gregory Jackson of preseason number one Ridge View and Cam Scott of Lexington made the Elite Boys team, while University of South Carolina signee Talaysia Cooper of East Clarendon, Joyce Edwards of Camden, MiLaysi...

Brookland-Cayce High School held the annual SC Basketball Coaches Association Media Day Wednesday.

The event served to highlight the preseason top 10 rankings in each classification. The Association also released its list of the top seniors in each classification, as well as an Elite Player list for both girls and boys.

Gregory Jackson of preseason number one Ridge View and Cam Scott of Lexington made the Elite Boys team, while University of South Carolina signee Talaysia Cooper of East Clarendon, Joyce Edwards of Camden, MiLaysia Fulwiley of Class 2A preseason number one WJ Keenan and Lower Richland’s Anala Nelson were selected to the Elite girls list.

S.C. Basketball Coaches Association’s Preseason Rankings

(BOYS)

Class 5A

1. Ridge View

2. Dorman

3. Dutch Fork

4. Riverside

5. Goose Creek

6. Clover

7. Mauldin

8. Fort Dorchester

9. Conway

10. J.F. Byrnes

Top Five Seniors - Lawrence Bartee, Clover; Houston Jones, Dutch Fork; Jonah Nesmith, Carolina Forest: Jordyn Surratt, Dorman; Isaiah Williams, Blythewood

Class 4A

1. South Pointe

2. Greenville

3. Irmo

4. West Florence

5. Hartsville

6. Travelers Rest

7. North Augusta

8. AC Flora

9. Beaufort

10. Hilton Head

Top Five Seniors - Jacob Brown, Travelers Rest; Bryson Felder, Westwood; Tristan Lexander, Hartsville; Quan Peterson, South Pointe; Dylan Williams, Irmo

Class 3A

1. Orangeburg-Wilkinson

2. Keenan

3. Seneca

4. Dillon

5. Berea

6. Oceanside

7. Blue Ridge

8. Daniel

9. Lake City

10. Brookland-Cayce

Top Five Seniors - Justin Bailey, Blue Ridge; Demarco Bethea, Dillon; EJ Evett, Seneca; Jordan Simpson, Orangeburg-Wilkinson; Bobby Taylor, Daniel

Class 2A

1. Christ Church

2. Gray Collegiate

3. York Prep

4. Wade Hampton

5. Andrew Jackson

6. Landrum

7. Phillip Simmons

8. Abbeville

9. Woodland

10. Chesnee

Top Seniors - Russell Branch, Barnwell; Kory Davis, York Prep; Miles Haight, Phillip Simmons; Ca’Darrius Sowell, Andrew Jackson; Isaiah Washington, Landrum

Elite Boys

Jordan Butler, Christ Church; Noah Clowney, Dorman; Zachary Davis, Denmark-Olar; Gregory Jackson, Ridge View; Cam Scott, Lexington

(GIRLS)

Class 5A

1. Sumter

2. Rock Hill

3. JL Mann

4. Wando

5. Dorman

6. Lexington

7. Woodmont

8. West Ashley

9. Summerville

10. J.F. Byrnes

Top Five Seniors - Jasmine Grant, Summerville; Jasmine Jenkins, Cane Bay; Kristen Jenkins, West Ashley; Savannah Porter, Byrnes; Alexis Sexton, Lexington;

Dylan Silber, Wando (inj.)

Class 4A

1. Westside

2. North Augusta

3. Westwood

4. South Pointe

5. AC Flora

6. Catawba Ridge

7. Bluffton

8. Eastside

9. South Florence

10. North Myrtle Beach

Top Five Seniors - Jacob Brown, Travelers Rest; Bryson Felder, Westwood; Tristan Lexander, Hartsville; Quan Peterson, South Pointe; Dylan Williams, Irmo

Class 3A

1. Keenan

2. Orangeburg-Wilkinson

3. Camden

4. Blue Ridge

5. Southside

6. Emerald

7. Wren

8. Clinton

9. Bishop England

10. Daniel

Top Five Seniors - Justin Bailey, Blue Ridge; Demarco Bethea, Dillon; EJ Evett, Seneca; Jordan Simpson, Orangeburg-Wilkinson; Bobby Taylor, Daniel

Class 2A

1. Blacksburg

2. Christ Church

3. Silver Bluff

4. Phillip Simmons

5. Andrew Jackson

6. Gray Collegiate

7. Saluda

8. Latta

9. Marion

10. Barnwell

Russell Branch, Barnwell; Kory Davis, York Prep; Miles Haight, Phillip Simmons; Ca’Darrius Sowell, Andrew Jackson; Isaiah Washington, Landrum

Elite Players - Talaysia Cooper, East Clarendon; Joyce Edwards, Camden; MiLaysia Fulwiley, Keenan; Jada Jones, Rock Hill; McCall King, Christ Church; Anala Nelson, Lower Richland; Jessica Woods, Westwood; Shardasia Zeigler, Orangeburg-Wilkinson

Beaufort Eagles in 2021 football state championship: How they got there

Beaufort High School, playing in the Class 4A state championship Thursday night, is making its second championship appearance since desegregation in 1964. The Eagles lost to Clover in the 2007 championship game. Previously, the team won titles in 1933 and 1945.Here’s a look at how Beaufort got to the championship game this year. The Eagles play South Pointe in the title game at 7 p.m. Thursday at Benedict College’s Charlie W. Johnson Stadium.Greenwood native Bryce Lybrand is in his third season as head coach at Beau...

Beaufort High School, playing in the Class 4A state championship Thursday night, is making its second championship appearance since desegregation in 1964. The Eagles lost to Clover in the 2007 championship game. Previously, the team won titles in 1933 and 1945.

Here’s a look at how Beaufort got to the championship game this year. The Eagles play South Pointe in the title game at 7 p.m. Thursday at Benedict College’s Charlie W. Johnson Stadium.

Greenwood native Bryce Lybrand is in his third season as head coach at Beaufort. He was hired as an assistant coach in 2018. When DeVonte Holloman left Beaufort after one season to go to his alma mater, South Pointe, Lybrand earned the head coaching position.

He has made the playoffs in all three seasons, winning region titles in 2019-2020. Before coming to Beaufort, Lybrand was an assistant at Wando and Fort Dorchester in South Carolina, and Providence High School in Charlotte, N.C. The Greenwood native began his career as a student assistant under Dabo Swinney at Clemson and also coached at Carson Newman, a Division II school in Tennessee.

QB Tyler Haley: Was 168-of-273 passing for 16 touchdowns. He also carried the ball 62 times for 558 yards and nine touchdowns.

RB Amariee Morris: Leads team with 996 yards rushing and 18 touchdowns.

WR Zyrin Odom: Caught 40 passes for team-high 785 yards and nine touchdowns.

WR Kacy Fields: Leads team with 50 receptions for 720 yards and three scores.

DL Eamon Smalls: Sophomore Division I prospect has 66 tackles, 16 for loss, 3½ sacks and 10 quarterback pressures.

DL Alvin Wilson: Shrine Bowl and Touchstone Energy Bowl selection has 75 tackles, 27 for loss, 8½ sacks and 19 quarterback pressures.

LB James Dennison: Leads the team with 97 tackles, nine tackles for loss, three quarterback pressures and three interceptions.

DB Colton Phares: Tops in the secondary with 71 tackles, six for loss and five pass break-ups.

? Aug. 20: Beaufort 28, Richmond Hill (Ga.) 8: Amariee Morris rushed for 91 yards and two touchdowns in Beaufort’s season-opening win. Zack Talbert returned a fumble for a TD and Zyrin Odom had 60 yards receiving for the Eagles.

? Aug. 27: Beaufort 24, Effingham (Ga.) 3: Quarterback Tyler Haley threw a 60-yard touchdown pass to Zyrin Odom and added a 40-yarder to Kacy Fields. Caleb Ulmer added a two-yard run and Joe Caprarola had a 47 yard field goal.

? Sept. 3: Beaufort 33, Benedictine (Ga.) 23: Tyler Haley threw for 283 yards, rushed for 53 with three total touchdowns to lead the Eagles over a strong Benedictine squad. Amariee Morris led Beaufort’s running game with 121 yards rushing and a TD. Zyrin Odom was tops in receiving with 136 yards and a TD.

? Sept. 10: Beaufort 38, West Ashley 7: Tyler Haley threw for 217 yards and three touchdowns in the non-region win. McLeod Reichel caught seven passes for 117 yards and a TD, and Zyrin Odom had three catches for 85 yards and TD. James Dennison returned an interception for a score.

? Sept. 17: Oceanside Collegiate 31, Beaufort 17: Rico Harrell returned an interception for a touchdown to break a 17-17 tie with less than four minutes to help Oceanside hand Beaufort its first loss of the season. Tyler Haley had a TD pass to Zytin Odom and Amariee Morris had a TD for Beaufort

? Oct. 1: Beaufort 38, Hilton Head Island 14: Amariee Morris ran for 87 yards and three touchdowns as the Eagles won their region opener. Quarterback Tyler Haley threw a touchdown pass and Zyrin Odom also had a kickoff return for a score. Haley finished with 201 yards passing, and Kacy Fields had 136 yards receiving.

? Oct. 8: Beaufort 16, James Island 0: Joe Caprarola kicked three field goals and the Eagles defense picked off two passes in the win over the Islanders. Beaufort running back Caleb Ulmer rushed for 101 yards and quarterback Tyler Haley was 13-of-20 passing for 176 yards.

? Oct. 15 May River 24, Beaufort 21: Garvin Douglas ran for 200 yards and two touchdowns as the Sharks defeated the Eagles. Amariee Morris ran for 139 yards in the loss.

? Oct. 22: Beaufort 45, Bluffton 12: Tyler Haley threw for 327 yards and three touchdowns to Zyrin Odom, who caught four passes for 114 yards. The win clinched the second spot in Region 7-4A for Beaufort.

? Oct. 29: Beaufort 44, Colleton County 6: Kacy Fields caught two TD passes and Caleb Ulmer ran for two in the Eagles’ regular-season finale.

? Nov. 5: Beaufort 30, South Florence 14: Tyler Haley threw two touchdown passes to Zyrin Odom, and Joe Caprarola kicked three field goals as the Eagles won their first-round playoff game.

? Nov. 12: Beaufort 42, North Augusta 10: Amariee Morris ran for three touchdowns, Tyler Haley had two TD runs, and Jalin Porter returned an interception for touchdown in the second round win.

? Nov. 19: Beaufort 20, Myrtle Beach 19: The Beaufort defense knocked down a go-ahead two-point conversion pass with 1:06 left to knock off top-ranked Myrtle Beach. Tyler Haley’s 6-yard pass to McLeod Reichel gave Beaufort a 20-13 lead with 4:19 left. Haley had 161 yards of offense.

? Nov. 26: Beaufort 42, West Florence 10: Amariee Morris ran for 70 yards and four touchdowns for the Eagles, who earned a spot in the Class 4A championship game. Quarterback Tyler Haley had 185 yards of offense and a TD.

CofC In The News: Week of Nov. 29, 2021

College of Charleston “In the News” is a weekly roundup of news articles featuring College faculty, staff, students or alumni. Recent media coverage of the College includes:Geology professor Vijay Vulava talks to Coastal News Today about flooding....

College of Charleston “In the News” is a weekly roundup of news articles featuring College faculty, staff, students or alumni. Recent media coverage of the College includes:

Geology professor Vijay Vulava talks to Coastal News Today about flooding.

Charleston hopes old Piggly Wiggly site will modernize West Ashley. Skeptics see a one-off.

The Post and Courier interviews historic preservation professor Barry Stiefel about the cost of living in West Ashley.

Hospitality and Tourism professor Daniel Guttentag talks to The Post and Courier about tourism rates in the Lowcountry.

It’s a long drive to butcher shop for Charleston’s Muslim community

Garrett Davidson, professor of Arabic and Muslim studies, talks to The Post and Courier about food.

Political science professor Kendra Stewart talks to the Charleston City Paper about upcoming elections.

The Charleston City Paper previews Cougar Night Lights.

Click here for the latest news from the College of Charleston News Wire.

CALENDAR: Dunning, CJO to bring holiday swing to Charleston Music Hall

Staff reports | Vocalist Zandrina Dunning will join the Charleston Jazz Orchestra (CJO) led by Maestro Robert Lewis for two Dec. 4 concerts guaranteed to put you in the holiday spirit.It’s a Charleston Jazz tradition with big band arrangements of winter classics and holiday favorites such as “Winter Wonderland,” “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” and “Sleigh Bells.”Dunning, who began singing as a youth in church and elementary school, began her professional musical journey study...

Staff reports | Vocalist Zandrina Dunning will join the Charleston Jazz Orchestra (CJO) led by Maestro Robert Lewis for two Dec. 4 concerts guaranteed to put you in the holiday spirit.

It’s a Charleston Jazz tradition with big band arrangements of winter classics and holiday favorites such as “Winter Wonderland,” “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” and “Sleigh Bells.”

Dunning, who began singing as a youth in church and elementary school, began her professional musical journey studying classical music and theatre arts at S.C. State University in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in music industry with a concentration in vocal music in 2004. Since 2013, she has been managing her own career with a broad array of concerts and tribute shows. She also works with show production for Forte Jazz Lounge and Charleston Music Hall and in programming and management locally at OHM Radio.

Under the direction of Lewis, the CJO has been performing for audiences in the Lowcountry for more than12 years. It is comprised of 18 accomplished jazz musicians and is an entertaining and educational example of the rich history of jazz in Charleston.

Performances on Dec. 4 will be at 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets are on sale now at www.charlestonjazz.com or call the Charleston Jazz box office at 843-641-0011. Tickets range from $25-$62, with discounts for seniors, military and students.

Also on the calendar:

Keeping it local: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Dec. 4, Johns Island County Park, 2662 Mullet Hall Rd., Johns Island. The 8th annual Homegrown Holiday Bazaar will include about 75 vendors from whom you can get all of your holiday shopping, according to the Sea Island Chamber of Commerce. In addition to great gifts, there will be a kiddie train ride, horse rides and a special visitor from the North Pole. Food trucks will be available as well as local craft beer, wine and music.

Holiday Festival of Lights: 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m, through Dec. 31, James Island County Park.. Visitors can drive through the impressive three-mile light spectacle with more than 750 illuminated displays. The festival also includes other holiday activities like train rides, marshmallow roasting, a climbing wall and more. There also will be a Winter Wonderland, which features the area’s largest holiday sand sculpture made from more than 50 tons of sand. You and your family can also explore the shops, an enchanted walking trail and the amazing dancing light display. Tickets It is recommended that visitors purchase tickets in advance online.

Elf the Musical returns: Dec. 1-19, Dock Street Theatre, Charleston. The popular musical, sold out in Charleston in 2019, returns for several holiday performances by actors at Charleston Stage. Based on the 2003 film starring Will Ferrell, the musical tells the story of Buddy the Elf who is transported from Santa’s Workshop to New York City. Click here for times and tickets, which range from $32 for students to $36 to $75 for adults..

Winter Wonderland exhibit. Through March 27, 2022, Lowcountry Image Gallery, The Charleston Museum, 360 Meeting St., Charleston. This exhibit showcases colorized photographs of remarkable snow days captured by residents of Charleston dating to the late 19th and early 20th centuries. More on tickets and hours.

Birds of Prey flight demonstrations: 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Thursdays and Saturdays, Center for Birds of Prey, 4719 Highway 17. Awendaw. The center has reopened its doors to visitors after closing due to the COvID-19 pandemic, inviting people to once again come and explore the world of raptors through an outdoor program and flight demonstration. Tickets: . $20/adult; $15/children age 3-17.

Bird-watching at Caw Caw. Every Wednesday and Saturday — particularly through the end of February — you can see a plethora of birds at Caw Caw Interpretive Center in Ravenel as they make their way through the Lowcountry. The two-hour regular walks, which start at 8:30 a.m., are through distinct habitats that allow participants to view and discuss a variety of birds, butterflies, and other organisms. Registration is not required. Participants are encouraged to bring their own binoculars. A paid chaperone is required for participants ages 15 and under. Max. 10 participants. Fee: $9; free for Gold Pass holders. Open to all ages. More: Caw Caw Interpretive Center.

Farmers markets

Closing in December

Holy City Farmers Market: 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., every Wednesday, Holy City Brewing, North Charleston. vendors rotate weekly to provide shoppers with a tiny but mighty shopping experience. vendors will be selling a range of products from specialty foods, home and body care to arts and crafts. More info. Closes Dec. 18 with holiday market.

Open year-round

West Ashley Farmers Market: 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., every Wednesday, Ackerman Park, 55 Sycamore Avenue, Charleston. More.

Sunday Brunch Farmers Market: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., every Sunday, Charleston Pour House, 1977 Maybank Highway, James Island. While the market is discouraging people from spending too much time hanging out during the market, everyone is invited to shop their local vendors. More info.

Sea Island Farmers Market: 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., every Saturday. Charleston Collegiate Campus, 2024 Academy Rd., Johns Island. More.

Goose Creek Farmers Market: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., every Saturday, 519 N. Goose Creek Blvd., Goose Creek. More.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.